Use Cases

EEG provides a window into the functioning brain. By observing behavior and brain activity, neuroscience researchers can gain insight into how the two are correlated. Typically this involves monitoring EEG during well defined brain states or in cognitive tasks. EEG is also clinically used in the detection and characterization of epileptic seizures, brain lesions (from tumors, stroke or others), coma, monitoring in anesthesia or in the study of sleep, for example. Recently, we and other research groups have been developing EEG biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s disease, with promising results. Our technologies Enobio and Starstim make it now possible to easily record quality EEG in the lab, clinic or at home for any of these applications.

Patients can use neurofeedback to learn to modulate their EEG using audiovisual feedback of their brain activity – an approach shown to be effective in ADHD, for instance. Our Neurosurfer platform is unique in providing concurrent transcranial brain stimulation and neurofeedback with virtual reality (VR).

EEG provides a unique opportunity in terms of temporal resolution, wearability and cost compared to other neuroimaging techniques when it comes to potential Human Computer Interaction applications. The field of Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) is largely based on EEG for these reasons. Another field, known as Affective BCI, seeks to develop measures of the affective state of a user based on their EEG and other physiological measures.

Transcranial Current Stimulation (tCS or tES as is also called, including tDCS, tACS and tRNS) is a non-invasive form of electrical neuromodulation. It is being intensely used in basic neuroscience and clinical research. Recent studies by several groups worldwide indicate that tCS holds significant potential in the treatment of chronic pain, stroke rehabilitation, depression, addiction and cognitive enhancement.

Advanced Research for Future Applications - Hyperinteraction

A Direct Brain-to-Brain Interface in Humans for Conscious Communication

Human sensory and motor systems provide the natural means for the exchange of information between individuals, and, hence, the basis for human civilization. The recent development of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) has provided an important element for the creation of brain-to-brain communication systems, and precise brain stimulation techniques are now available for the realization of non-invasive computer-brain interfaces (CBI). In this experiment we combined a BCI system using Starstim with a CBI based on robotic transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to demonstrate for the first time the possibility of direct brain-to-brain conscious communication in humans. A small step forward (the transmitted message was simple and in some ways similar to transmission using the morse code), but with interesting technological and methodological challenges on the way. More info and Video

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